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The Government of the Republic of Zambia, has in the recent past embarked on major reforms to review the technical education and vocational training (TEVT) in order to make it more responsive to the current training demands in the economy. In August 1994, the Minister of Science, Technology and Vocational Training appointed a widely representative national Task Force to review Government policy on technical education and vocational training and to recommend changes that would be necessary for the training system to meet new and emerging challenges in the national economy and society in general. It is a known fact that until then no serious attempt had been made to undertake such an exercise since the existing policies were formulated in 1968. In the meantime, the defining characteristics of the national economy and demographic patterns had both changed very significantly from the conditions under which the previous policies had been formulated. In spite of some attempts by the Department of Technical Education and Vocational Training to respond to the changing environment, the underlying policies and structures of the training system were clearly out of step with the dynamic demands and requirements of the country.

The Task Force submitted its recommendations in January, 1995 and soon after the Government issued a new policy on Technical Education, Vocational and Entrepreneurship Training by enacting a law, the TEVET Act No. 13 of 1998 read together with TEVET (Amendment) Act No. 11 of 2005which led to the establishment of the Technical Education, Vocational and Entrepreneurship Training Authority (TEVETA) whose responsibility is to interpret and implement the TEVET policy. The new policy has a broader emphasis than the previous one which almost exclusively catered for the needs of formal sector employment. The policy declares, in general terms, Government.s intention to develop a system of Technical Education, Vocational and Entrepreneurship Training, (or TEVET), that will satisfy the real demands and requirements of the labour market and socio-economic conditions, all of which were recognised to be in a state of constant change.